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2015-04-20

Marijuana Use Lacks Long-Term Negative Consequences

Well, it's April 20th, a celebratory or sacred day for those who are pro-marijuana (whether for recreational, medical, or spiritual use). So as appropriate for this day, I share with you a new study that contradicts the long-held belief that marijuana use during our teen years has long-lasting negative cognitive health effects.

This study was conducted by the researchers because there is some suggestion that heavy marijuana use during early adolescence (prior to age 17) may cause significant impairments in attention and academic functioning that remain despite sustained periods of abstinence. However, since no longitudinal studies have examined whether both male and female adolescents who engage in low (less than once a month) to moderate (at least once a monthly) marijuana use experience increased problems with attention and academic performance (and whether these problems remain following sustained abstinence), the researchers decided to see what the data would suggest.

The current study used within-individual change models to control for all potential pre-existing and time-stable confounding variables to examine this potential causal association. The data came from two gender-specific longitudinal samples assessed annually from ages 11 to 16 (Pittsburgh Youth Study N = 479; Pittsburgh Girls Study N = 2296). Analyses also controlled for the potential influence of several pertinent time-varying factors (e.g., other substance use, peer delinquency).

Prior to controlling for time-varying confounds, analyses indicated that adolescents tended to experience an increase in parent-reported attention and academic problems, relative to their pre-onset levels, during years when they used marijuana.

After controlling for several time-varying confounds, only the association between marijuana use and attention problems in the sample of girls remained statistically significant. Further, there was no evidence indicating that adolescents who used marijuana experienced lingering attention and academic problems, relative to their pre-onset levels, after abstaining from use for at least a year.

These results suggest that adolescents who engage in low to moderate marijuana use experience an increase in observable attention and academic problems, but these problems appear to be minimal and are eliminated following sustained abstinence.

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Source: Unfazed or Dazed and Confused: Does Early Adolescent Marijuana Use Cause Sustained Impairments in Attention and Academic Functioning?

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